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We priced storage facilities yesterday. Yikes! It depends on the location, but a 10′ x 10′ space costs between $200-$230 a month plus tax.

We’ve heard stories about people storing things for years, and when they empty their storage container most of the stuff goes into a dumpster. That’s insane! You paid lots of money to hold on to that junk only to discard it!

Why do humans hold onto stuff? What is it about “stuff?”

We’re moving our goods out of the basement in preparation for painting. And now we’re throwing out more stuff. We’ve done this once and are doing it again. Stuff to Goodwill, stuff to charities, stuff to recycling…

I hope we can stick to a 10 x 10 or maybe even squeeze down to a 10 x 5. You don’t want to know the prices for 10 x 15 or 10 x 20 storage!


Twice in the past month I swore I did X when I actually did Y. One time it was misremembering an online order’s shipping charges, and the other time was when I committed to the wrong git branch. 

Maybe my inevitable brain shrinkage has led to senility.


GeekWire had a couple of stories yesterday about start-up exits.

They’re in keeping with the usual exit article: Smiling faces, we’re very happy to be acquired by a competitor whom we previously said we were better than, etc. I’m not picking on GeekWire — all of our news sources, mainstream or otherwise, have this problem.

I’m reminded how we have so much partially accurate or wholly inaccurate news in our lives. We get the public statements asserting this or that, but we’ll never know what truly went down.

It’s more than, “History is written by the victors.” How can you know if what you know about the world is complete and accurate?


In a comment on my Thoughts on DEC post, Tom Miller offered a rat’s ass if I scanned in my VAX 8600 (Venus) Ibox microcode listing.

Well, here’s Venus Ibox microcode v3.73, generated on 7-May-1984. Tom, you owe me one rat’s patootie.

This ran on Venus through the end of 1984. I had transferred to Alan Kotok‘s Simplified Architecture for Fast Execution (SAFE) project, where I was looking into VAX-11 emulation. Large VAX Engineering’s senior management called an “all hands on deck” emergency, and everyone needed do whatever they could to help Venus ship on time.  So, I informally returned to work on Venus and ran one of the lab debug shifts. It was equally exhilarating and stressful… An, “I wouldn’t trade those memories for anything in the world,” and, “I hope I never go through something like that again,” experience.

This version ran VMS and oodles of VAX programs.  I don’t know if there was a later version; if so, I never heard about it.

BTW, here’s a nice paper about why DEC went down the tubes.